Officials can disclose what happens in executive session

ATLANTA — Elected officials are free to speak about what goes on in executive sessions, according to a leading authority on the Georgia Open Meetings Act. Attorney David Hudson said elected officials do not give up their First Amendment rights to free speech simply because they hold office or because they participate in an executive…

Attorney-client privilege is a misnomer, often abused

Principle should always matter more than precedence or practice. As a matter of principle, government attorneys should represent the governed, first and foremost. In precedent and practice, however, it appears government lawyers cater their representation to elected officials themselves. Anyone employed with public monies should work for the public. If an attorney is hired to…

Government retreats show disregard for citizens

It is that time of year again. It is retreat season Local governments are planning their out-of-town all-day or two-day retreats where they get together and discuss their respective legislative agendas for the rest of the year. To be fair, they give public notice and the public is welcome to attend. We should also say…

Standing United for Open Government

Welcome to the Transparency Project of Georgia. As individuals it’s easy to feel disenfranchised, and to believe that the very people elected to represent us in fact assault the rights of the individual. Among our most important civil liberties is the fundamental First Amendement right of free speech, and among our most important rights to…